• Home
    Home This is where you can find all the blog posts throughout the site.
  • Categories
    Categories Displays a list of categories from this blog.
  • Tags
    Tags Displays a list of tags that have been used in the blog.
  • Bloggers
    Bloggers Search for your favorite blogger from this site.
  • Archives
    Archives Contains a list of blog posts that were created previously.
  • Login
    Login Login form

Screen-Shot-2018-04-23-at-2.07.33-PM.png

If you're a parent you want your kids to be successful.

I mean, I get that you should allow them to fail and learn from failure. I get that on the road to success, our kids will undoubtedly fail. If you preach and do that, you're awesome in my book.

So while we all want our kids to fail forward, no parent or teacher wants their kids to struggle to make a living. Each one of us, wants our kids to have the skills and the will to crush the challenges of life. But there's one thing that can stop them: School.

Or rather, schooling.

...
Last modified on

Screen-Shot-2018-04-13-at-9.51.51-AM.png

When You Teach Something You Get To Learn It Twice - Jim Kwik

Cameron, a former student of mine, who is now in college, commented on my recent post about efficient and effective learning titled Too Much What, Not Enough How. Here's what he wrote on Facebook:

As a student who graduated with a GPA well above 4.0, I completely agree specifically with the point about students teaching subject-matter. Most of what made me successful was not studying - I rarely did that - but teaching other students, and in doing so, closing gaps in and solidifying what I knew. I tutored other students in almost every single class I took throughout my high school career, especially the science courses. That was my secret to success and I didn't even realize it until senior year. The feeling you get when you help someone grasp an idea they struggled with is an awesome feeling, too.

But Why Is Teaching Such An Effective Learning Strategy?

If you closely analyze and dissect Cameron's comment you can identify at least 4 aspects that made his strategy of teaching others to learn it yourself super effective. They are Active Learning, Deeper Learning, Efficient Learning, and Emotional Learning. 

...
Last modified on

Learning is like playing the blues.

If you wanna get really good at it and be able to improvise, you must practice playing the blues a lot. You must also understand it. The scales, the chord progressions, the beats, the turnaround, the stories, the mood; the "how to blues."

If you wanna get really good at learning you must practice learning. You must also understand it. The brain, the habits, the strategies, what works, what doesn't; "the how to learn."

If you understand how your brain learns you might be able to hack your learning; to improvise and modify sketchy study strategies that mostly don't work and make them more effective.

Today, I attempt to do that with cramming and if you read my last post What's The Brain Deal With Cramming? you know that I don't recommend it and instead advocate for smart spaced practice. 

...
Last modified on

StopTellingKidsToThinkOutsideTheBox.jpg

Tripping on 'shrooms in Prague once I stopped by an art gallery window and saw it. It was an orange dog; the tiniest of canines. A stain of fluorescent orange paint in the bottom right corner of a sizable painting of some natural scenery. I remember the grass, the trees, and the people in it but in that moment all I could focus on was the strange orange dog.

I was 23, window shopping, and laughing too hard at a silly little orange dog on an otherwise green painting. Later, I was examining people's faces on the metro ride back to the Airbnb-style room I booked. Being aware I'm influenced I felt I could look into anyone's soul and know who they were. It was like a superpower that allowed me to see them for who they really were; if they were good or bad.

And in case the good people in my school district's HR department are reading this occurred 17 years ago, happened before I became a teacher, and was the last time I used psychedelics. It's just that I still remember that dang dog and wonder if my memory would be so vivid had my consciousness not been altered. For some reason, my mind decided it was significant enough to keep and maybe it uses it somehow to this day without me even realizing.

Using More Of The Brain

Steve Jobs, Richard Feynman, Jimi Hendrix, Jean-Paul Sartre, Bill Gates, John Coltrane, and The Beatles have 2 things in-common; they changed the world by being the GOATs (greatest of all time) of their respective crafts and they operated outside of the realm of conditioned and compliant thinking. Oh, and they all used psychedelics, so that would make it three things I suppose.

...
Last modified on

Hi!

Earlier this year I created a new resource we all can use to help kids focus. And let's be real. Many adults, myself included, lose focus from time to time (that's a vague way of saying often). As we're not robots, we all need a reminder from time to time (same as above :).

Working with teens for 180 days each year for the last 14, I noticed that many flat out don't know how to focus, need help with focus, or simply lack focus. The reasons why kids might have a hard time focusing are many; lack of sleep, lack of movement, a surge of emotions, mental health etc. They are all valid.

The infographic below is about achieving deep work and insane productivity in the moment. It is to be used during those home or classroom moments when your kids have a hard time getting going on a task or project. It is a system anyone can use to achieve laser focus and to get things done. And, I plan on putting it up and using it often with my high school students this year.

Check it out.

...
Last modified on